YoTrip-Words and Thoughts

A place and space for me to express my thoughts

Thursday Thinking by YoTrip for May 5, 2011-Mother’s Deserve to be Celebrated 365 Days a Year (Vol.5, Iss.1)


 Mother’s Deserve to be Celebrated 365 Days a Year

 
Sunday, May 8th is the day designated to honor the women children young and old call Mother, Mom,Ma, Mamma, Mum, Mommy,Mummy, and of the southern favorite, Madea. No matter how you refer to the lady who gave you life, raised you, nutured you, and loves you unconditionally she has earned her title. Mother’s deserve to be celebrated 365 days a year for being our inceptor (life begin with a mother), incubator (life grew in a mother), influencer (life was nutured by a mother), and our inspiration (life lessons learned from a mother). At every stage of life you can count on Mothers to do what Mother’s do best: be there with love and support for their children.
 
Please do not wait for Sunday to tell your Mother: “Thank you”, “I love you”, “You are the best”, “Greatest Mother on the planet” or whatever phase shows the depths of your gratitude for all she has done for you. Everyday we can celebrate Mothers and it will not cover her love, care and concern for her children. Thank God for Mother’s past, present and for the promised future. Happy Mother’s Day to all the Mother’s of the World.
 
A Special Happy Mother’s Day to the best of the best Mom’s, Marian A. Clay– “I am, because you are!”
 
To read more on the history of Mother’s Day see the information below:

 

Julia Ward Howe’s Mother’s Day Proclamaition of 1870

The first North American Mother’s Day was conceptualized with Julia Ward Howe’s Mother’s Day Proclamation in 1870. Despite having penned The Battle Hymn of the Republic 12 years earlier, Howe had become so distraught by the death and carnage of the Civil War that she called on Mother’s to come together and protest what she saw as the futility of their Sons killing the Sons of other Mothers.

The Rise & Fall of Howe’s Mother’s Day

At one point Howe even proposed converting July 4th into Mother’s Day, in order to dedicate the nation’s anniversary to peace. Eventually, however, June 2nd was designated for the celebration. In 1873 women’s groups in 18 North American cities observed this new Mother’s holiday. Howe initially funded many of these celebrations, but most of them died out once she stopped footing the bill. The city of Boston, however, would continue celebrating Howe’s holiday for 10 more years.

Despite the decided failure of her holiday, Howe had nevertheless planted the seed that would blossom into what we know as Mother’s Day today. A West Virginia women’s group led by Anna Reeves Jarvis began to celebrate an adaptation of Howe’s holiday. In order to re-unite families and neighbors that had been divided between the Union and Confederate sides of the Civil War, the group held a Mother’s Friendship Day.

Anna M. Jarvis’s Mother’s Day in 1908

After Anna Reeves Jarvis died, her daughter Anna M. Jarvis campaigned for the creation of an official Mother’s Day in remembrance of her mother and in honor of peace. In 1908, Anna petitioned the superintendent of the church where her Mother had spent over 20 years teaching Sunday School. Her request was honored, and on May 10, 1908, the first official Mother’s Day celebration took place at Andrew’s Methodist Church in Grafton, West Virginia and a church in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The West Virginia event drew a congregation of 407 and Anna Jarvis arranged for white carnations—her Mother’s favorite flower—to adorn the patrons. Two carnations were given to every Mother in attendance. Today, white carnations are used to honor deceased Mothers, while pink or red carnations pay tribute to Mothers who are still alive. Andrew’s Methodist Church exists to this day, and was incorporated into the International Mother’s Day Shrine in 1962.

US Government Adoption

In 1908 a U.S. Senator from Nebraska, Elmer Burkett, proposed making Mother’s Day a national holiday at the request of the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA). The proposal was defeated, but by 1909 forty-six states were holding Mother’s Day services as well as parts of Canada and Mexico.

Anna Jarvis quit working and devoted herself full time to the creation of Mother’s Day, endlessly petitioning state governments, business leaders, women groups, churches and other institutions and organizations. She finally convinced the World’s Sunday School Association to back her, a key influence over state legislators and congress. In 1912 West Virginia became the first state to officially recognize Mother’s Day, and in 1914 Woodrow Wilson signed it into national observance, declaring the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day.

The Fight Over Commercialization

The holiday flourished in the United States and flowers, especially white carnations, became very popular. One business journal, Florists Review, went so far as to print, “This was a holiday that could be exploited.” But the budding commercialization of Mother’s Day greatly disturbed Jarvis, so she vociferously opposed what she perceived as a misuse of the holiday. In 1923 she sued to stop a Mother’s Day event, and in the 1930’s she was arrested for disturbing the peace at the American War Mothers group. She was protesting their sale of flowers. In the 1930’s Jarvis also petitioned against the postage stamp featuring her Mother, a vase of white carnations and the word “Mother’s Day.” Jarvis was able to have the words “Mother’s Day” removed. The flowers remained. In 1938, Time Magazine ran an article about Jarvis’s fight to copyright Mother’s Day, but by then it was already too late to change the commercial trend.

In opposition to the flower industry’s exploitation of the holiday, Jarvis wrote, “What will you do to route charlatans, bandits, pirates, racketeers, kidnappers and other termites that would undermine with their greed one of the finest, noblest and truest movements and celebrations?” Despite her efforts, flower sales on Mother’s Day continued to grow. Florist’s Review wrote, “Miss Jarvis was completely squelched.”

Anna Jarvis died in 1948, blind, poor and childless. Jarvis would never know that it was, ironically, The Florist’s Exchange that had anonymously paid for her care. http://www.mothersdaycentral.com/about-mothersday/history/

 
~~May is National Mental Health Awareness Month-Exercise your MIND Daily!~~

Please Keep the people of Haiti, Chile, the Gulf region, Japan, the Middle East and Alabama in your thoughts and prayers. Give to http://www.newmissions.org/

Write your Story. Join the Orlando Renaissance Writers Guild. http://www.orwriters.org/. Purchase a copy of the collaborative book an “ANTHOLOGY” at the listed website.

“Soaring Towards Heaven In 2011”
The Sky Is Limitless…

Yolanda Clay Triplett
“YoTrip”

The Orlando Renaissance Writer’s Guild, Inc.
~”2011 Writer of the Year”~

http://www.yotrip.wordpress.com
http://www.yotrip-wordsandthoughts.blogspot.com
Follow me on Twitter:@yotrip729
Find me on Facebook: facebook.com/yolanda.c.triplett
“Words the joyful noise of my
mouth, sweet sounds to my ears.The
results of a love affair between
pen and paper, words”
 
 
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